2002’s ‘Resident Evil’ Showed How Game Remakes Should Be Done

2002’s ‘Resident Evil’ Showed How Game Remakes Should Be Done

It was the tiger statue, in the small hallway off the caretaker’s room, where the infamous “itchy, tasty” diary is located, that really grabbed me. By 2002 I should have completed the original from 1996 resident Evil maybe a hundred times. In my most obsessive phases, when I was learning to run fast and trying to beat what was then the record time of one hour and 17 minutes, I would play the game from start to finish maybe three or four times a day, training each boss . fight, dodge enemies and pick up items almost perfectly: there was nothing left in resident Evil to surprise me. But this time, when I inserted the red gem and waited exactly the four seconds it would take for the statue to spit out the Colt Python, it took me by surprise.

Instead of the trusty Magnum appearing after I’d slotted the stone, four snakes suddenly fell from the ceiling, instantly transforming my health from yellow Caution “worth the risk” to “I-well-might-just-recharge-my-power.” -last-saved” Red Peril. A part of me was annoyed, this seemed like a cheap gimmick. But a larger part of me felt happy, gratified, as if this beloved game series I had basically worked to death on had a sudden injection of new life. It was still the tiger statue, still resident Evil, but Capcom had twisted my expectations and used them to create something new. This wasn’t just nostalgia, out of sheer nostalgia. It was an invitation to re-examine, re-explore, and fall in love all over again with something I thought had lost its charm.

Related: Watch us test the monstrous knowledge of the stars of the 2021 film, Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City

Twenty years later, the 2002 launch of resident Evil for Gamecube (and later PlayStations, Xboxes, Wii, Switch and PC) it is considered the quintessential example of how to remake a game. Dwell in this seemingly simple, but actually very complex and elusive rare sweet spot, where there’s just enough of the original game left to satisfy fans, but everything is remixed and reimagined to the point where it’s fully functional. in its own right.

It may be a hackneyed way of summarizing it, but what is 2002? resident Evil screenshots is not exactly the original game, but how to remember the original game, and how those memories make you feel. The circular balcony, over the main dining room where you first talk to Barry, is, I think, the best example. Go ahead and play the original and it seems, by modern standards, ridiculously cheap. The walls are single-textured, the view into the dining room is through a lame 2D image, and all enemies are easily telegraphed and avoided thanks to its aging and predictable AI. It’s impossible, using just this original game, to recapture what it felt like in 1996. But in the new version, with its detailed backgrounds, dynamic thunder and lightning effects, and zombies that will hunt you, fight you, and even when you’re The I’ve killed and it still finds its way back to life, the urgency, fear and awe it felt towards the original rekindles and returns.

Resident Evil (2002), PC HD version (2015) / Credit: Capcom
Resident Evil (2002), PC HD version (2015) / Credit: Capcom

It is a different game, but the experience, the emotion and the response that you have is as if it were the first time; somehow both new and familiar at the same time; a sentiment recognizable but not diminished – in fact, enhanced – by the passage of time. All the gaps than the original resident Evil left to your imagination they are full and crudely illustrated. The game as you remember it, as you used to exaggerate and embellish when telling your friends (did anyone Really turn off the console when they saw the first zombie?) now it’s really there, on the screen, real.

In part, this is what makes a good remake: identifying all the areas where people wanted more, envisioned more, and then delivered. Maybe it’s a select opinion, but for me, the only good part of final fantasy VII it was Midgar: as soon as I got out of that city and into what was supposed to be the game proper, I would always get distracted and the story would fade away, and I would find myself struggling to care about any of the other environments. And I can’t have been the only one, because what Final Fantasy VII Remake it does it so well and what it was praised for was refocusing on that city, clearly one of the most vivid and recognizable places in Square, now with much more substantial character and depth.

Resident Evil (2002), PC HD version (2015) / Credit: Capcom
Resident Evil (2002), PC HD version (2015) / Credit: Capcom

Similarly, I remember playing 2002 Mafia and it frustrated me how, despite the plot, the characters, and the setting, every time I got into a driving section or a shootout, I felt like I was experiencing something very clumsy and artificial, that the competence and cunning of the presentation in general they were never equaled by the parts you actually play. So the 2020 remake, which leaves most of the story intact but adds to it, refines it by making the missions equally consistent (you don’t trip over the mechanics and have to keep rebooting; when Tommy appears and talks like a killer in cutscenes, feels like one in game) stands out, again, as an example of what remakes should try to achieve.

This, I think, is the positive side of resident Evil Redothe legacy of As the game turns 20, I feel like it still provides a blueprint for other remakes (Max Payne and its sequel maybe) follow, continue. The goal is to identify what people remember, what they remember seeing, feeling and doing, and then which parts of that are accurate and which are tinted pink, about charitable nostalgia. And then you really deliver on rose-tinged charitable nostalgia. You take what people imagine or remember those old games were: Spencer Estate was a vast and terrifying labyrinth; Midgar was a sprawling metropolis; Mafia It was a great third-person shooter, with tense and difficult shootouts, and you make it real.

Resident Evil (2002), PC HD version (2015) / Credit: Capcom
Resident Evil (2002), PC HD version (2015) / Credit: Capcom

The flip side of this approach is how the remakes, if are done right, it may end up replacing the original game both in players’ memories and in the game’s broader lore. As game makers go back to the well and get better and better at remaking the games that made them great in the first place, we risk forgetting where our culture first came from. The influence of Resident Evil Remakenot only for the remakes of final fantasy VII Y Mafiabut of the souls of the devil, black table and of course Resident Evils two Y 3it’s very significant, and without it those games wouldn’t be as successful.

So you’d be foolish to think that the lessons to be learned from older video games only go back to 2002. Remakes can improve and serve as additions to older games, but they shouldn’t be treated as replacements. It may be the yellow gem that the Colt Python now brings to you, but you just enjoy that twist and appreciate its lineage and how it’s living up to your expectations, when you remember a time when it used to be red.

Leave a Comment