Resident Evil 7 was almost a live service game

ADVERTISEMENT

Resident Evil 7 was almost a live service game

Resident Evil 7 it was apparently almost a live service game with microtransactions and online multiplayer functionality, according to executive producer Jun Takeuchi. These elements were eventually removed to create what Takeuchi describes as “marketing’s worst nightmare”.

Because it was Resident Evil 7 almost a live service game?

in a new interview between Jun Takeuchi and industry legend Shinji Mikami, the two remember demonic resident, as well as the horror genre in general and various other topics. Takeuchi says that there was “a big push at Capcom” to make the kind of games that “players are asking for”. Apparently, Capcom’s marketing department interpreted this as making a demonic resident game with live service elements, microtransactions, a focus on online multiplayer, and lots of downloadable content. The latter doesn’t seem so far-fetched, but this nightmarish vision of Resident Evil 7 as a live service game it’s scarier than anything in the finished product.

A gloomy shot of the Baker mansion, with light coming through the windows, in Resident Evil 7
Single Player Creepy Horror Resident Evil 7 it was almost a live service multiplayer game.

According to Takeuchi, he was personally asked by Capcom president Kenzo Tsujimoto to step in and guide Resident Evil 7The development of after the development and marketing team could not agree on a direction for the game. Under Takeuchi’s direction, the game was gradually stripped of its extras, and multiplayer was rocketed from the start. The team “went through the list, cutting [elements] out” until they were left with what Takeuchi calls “marketing’s worst nightmare” in the form of a single-player horror game.

This did not deter Takeuchi from making what Shinji Mikami called “a game that scares players and creators” earlier in his interview. Both Mikami and Takeuchi agree that the core of demonic resident it’s horror, and no matter what else changes (with Takeuchi specifically referring to wacky moments like Ethan reattaching his hand or the weird Baker house puzzles), that’s the most important element. As far as we’re concerned, Resident Evil 7 it was a huge success on that front.

What else did we learn from Takeuchi and Mikami’s interview?

As much as demonic resident, Mikami and Takeuchi also talk about Mikami’s aspirations in the gaming industry. Mikami worked for Capcom between 1990 and 2004, during which time he released his first game, a quiz game for the Game Boy under the name of Capcom test: Hatena? without daiboken. That game apparently cost around $66,000 and took only three months to make, with a staff of three. Takeuchi says there’s “no way” a team of three could make a game in three months on $66,000 now, though I suspect he might be overlooking the indie development scene when he says that.

Perhaps more interesting are Mikami’s comments on his work at Tango Gameworks, the company he founded in 2010. Mikami served as director on the inaugural Tango project. the evil insideswitching to a producer role for the evil within 2 Y Ghostwire: Tokyo. Despite this resume, Mikami says his studio still hasn’t “properly created the game.” [he wants] yet”. Apparently, it’s “slowly gearing up” to do so – it may not be long before we hear more about Tango Gameworks’ next project.

A salaried visitor holding a tattered umbrella at Ghostwire: Tokyo
Apparently none of the Tango Gameworks titles have been exactly what Shinji Mikami is looking for.

Mikami and Takeuchi’s full interview is worth watching, as the two discuss much more than just Resident Evil 7. They touch on the development process of the original. demonic resident, including some fun tidbits about a cut character, as well as what game development was like in the 16-bit era and what horror means to both of them. Apparently, this is only the first part of the interview, so there’s a good chance we’ll get more soon. Stay tuned for more information as we get it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT