Will MultiVersus be the “Fortnite of Fighting”?

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Will MultiVersus be the “Fortnite of Fighting”?

Yes, yes, I know, I know, I cringed while writing that headline too, but having spent a bit of time with MultiVersus this afternoon, I think it’s a valid comparison to draw, and I’m not the only one who’s been making such comparisons, either.

For those unfamiliar, MultiVersus is the new platform fighter (read: Clone Smash) from Warner Brothers. It is currently available in open beta and follows a free model. It’s free to download and get started, but acquiring new characters requires grinding in-game currency through gameplay or paying hard premium in-game currency to unlock things right away. There is also a Battle Pass which, as always in this kind of thing, has a free premium level and a paid one, allowing you to unlock a series of rewards over the course of a “season”, with the most interesting rewards, Of course, being on the track pays.

Multi Versus

MultiVersus is everything I feel I should hate and loathe, and the fact that I’m not a particular fan of many Warner Bros. characters in the first place doesn’t help either, and yet I found myself having a good time. with that. Also, even despite immediately jumping into the online game against other people instead of hiding in the corner with the bots like I usually do, I didn’t find myself immediately demoralized and never wanting to touch it again. Rather, I found the experience quite exhilarating and enjoyable, and I’m curious to try it some more later.

This is the Fortnite angle. Take an established formula that has traditionally been considered quite harsh (first and third person shooters in the case of Fortnite, fighting games in the case of MultiVersus) and make it more accessible. Remove the barrier to entry entirely by making it free to start, provide incentives for people to keep playing after they’ve tried it out quickly with various reward trickles, and implement a robust matchmaking and network play system to allow for constant competition where you never have to. wait too long for an opponent.

I generally avoid free-to-play games because I tend to find the business model intrusive, particularly in the case of story-focused games with gacha mechanics. This is why I ended up bouncing off things like Granblue Fantasy and Fate/Grand Order despite their strong storytelling and characterization, and why I never bothered installing Genshin Impact.

Multi Versus

But for titles like MultiVersus this model makes much more sense. There is absolutely no attempt to contextualize anything that is going on here; it is simply a toy box where various Warner Bros. characters fight to prove who is the “best”. Why? No matter. It is only a game. With that in mind, it somehow feels less annoying when you run into parts of the game that you need to pay for or put effort into. Don’t get me wrong I’d be tearing this game up like a new idiot if it was a full price release, because that shit has there is no place on a title you already paid £20-£60 for, but as a free-to-play game? Works.

The limitations that are placed on you when you start playing MultiVersus are a good way to get to know the game. With only a few characters available in the “Fighter”, “Tank”, and “Support” archetypes, we encourage you to find the basic playstyle you feel most comfortable with, and then start getting to know a character a bit. better.

Each character has a “mastery” level, which allows you to unlock new features, including passive “perks” that can benefit both you and any teammates you have, and so there’s an incentive to spend some time getting familiar with them. one of the starting lineup. And that starting lineup is also easy to handle and understand; their various moves make sense and it will quickly become easy for you to understand the best times to use them.

Multi Versus

MultiVersus combat is Super Smash Bros. with a few changes. For starters, there’s no “up to jump” nonsense here, which eliminates one of my most constant frustrations with Smash’s controls. Here you have a jump button and a dodge button, the latter working both on the ground and in the air. Then you have an attack button (with four different attacks assigned based on whether or not you’re pushing in a particular direction when you press it) and a special button (also with four options). That’s all you really need to know to get started.

A short, rather tedious but reasonably useful tutorial introduces newcomers to platform fighters to the basics of the genre, and is well worth completing because it rewards you with a playable character. From there, you have the option to play against bots or real players, and in both cases you can take on 1v1 brawls, 2v2 team battles, or 2vs AI survival brawls. There’s also a training room called The Lab where you can practice your moves against a customizable opponent, and it can be accessed while you’re waiting for the matchup if it takes a while.

Online performance was absolutely flawless while gaming; there was no evidence of stuttering or lag, and the controls felt fully responsive at all times. There was no point where I felt like I was fighting other people’s connections instead of their characters, and the experience felt as seamless as if I were playing against bots offline. Obviously, a lot of effort has been put into the netcode for this game, which is sure to please those who care particularly about these things.

Multi Versus

Social features are pretty limited at the moment; there’s no real-time chat, for example, and communication with other players is perhaps best handled through third-party software like Steam at the moment. However, you can search for people you’ve recently played with, check their MultiVersus and Steam profiles when applicable, and invite them to play a party with you. Matches also have a default “best of three” format if all participants agree; however, any player is free to drop out at any time.

Positivity is encouraged through the ability to “toast” other players after you’ve played with them, though oddly enough it requires another in-game currency to do this, and it’s not entirely clear how it’s acquired. At the other end of the spectrum, blocking toxic or cheating players is a simple push of a button on the social panel.

Speaking of cheats, the PC version of the game uses Easy Anti-Cheat (also known as EAC) software, which some players will no doubt be averse to, though keep in mind that EAC is a fairly adopted anti-cheat solution at this point. moment, which appears in a variety of different games including, yes, Fortnite.

Multi Versus

Anti-cheat software can sometimes be a bit annoying on PC, but apart from MultiVersus taking a bit longer to load than you’d expect for a game like this, it didn’t seem to have any noticeable impact on the in-game action. . Let’s hope MultiVersus’ EAC implementation doesn’t suffer from any account lockout bugs – Apex Legends was in the news recently for incorrectly banning player accounts in the event of simple connection errors, for example.

There are some particularly praiseworthy features about MultiVersus. An extensive glossary of game terms makes learning game-specific jargon a breeze. Lots of optional tutorials let you practice more advanced skills beyond the initial lesson. And the in-game feedback is absolutely excellent, with a fully customizable interface that makes it clear how the match is going, what the status of each character is, and even the effects that various offensive and defensive moves apply when successfully performed.

My only hesitation with MultiVersus at the moment is that there are simply no characters that Really to worry. Wonder Woman is great, yes, and I’ll always have a soft spot for Bugs Bunny and Tom and Jerry, but there just isn’t the same “magic” that Smash has in terms of the roster. I’m sure this will change over time: Warner Bros. has a enormous after all, a catalog of characters that they could potentially take advantage of in the long run, but right now Smash still has a significant edge in terms of getting me excited about trying out different fighters.

also has a batch more for the single player to enjoy, while MultiVersus is very much about a simple and straightforward competitive fighting experience. Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it does mean that the pack as a whole has a slightly different focus than Smash.

Multi Versus

There’s no risk in getting involved with MultiVersus though, unless you pay attention to people in tinfoil hats who Really I don’t like EAC, so even if you, like me, aren’t entirely sure about the game’s roster or competitive approach, it’s worth a try. You may find yourself with a new gaming obsession, and in the long run, maybe it will convince more fighting game creators to consider taking the free-to-play approach. It seems that it will be a good means to bring a batch more people in the community if the initial performance of this game is anything to go by.

Multiversus is available for free in open beta now for PC via Steam Y epic game store, playstation 4/5 Y Xbox One Boop/Series.

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